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Back to Archives | Back to September 2007 Contents 

Advances & Applications

Advances & Applications



Gwinnett County Police Training Complex

Savage Range Systems Completes Gwinnett County Police Training Complex

Savage Range Systems, Inc., manufacturers of indoor and outdoor shooting ranges, bullet traps, and targetry and shoot houses, recently completed the Gwinnett County Police Training Facility in Lawrenceville, Georgia. This facility, the largest of its type east of the Mississippi River, is expected to train over 100 new police recruits each year and provide quarterly in-service qualification training for more than 650 officers.

Savage Range Systems was contracted to supply the entire range package, featuring the Model 800 Dry Snail Traps with automatic bullet recovery systems, including static as well as turning- and running-man target systems. Both ranges, containing a total of 30 shooting lanes, are fully baffled for tactical shooting. The two ranges, measuring 132 and 88 linear feet wide, consumed over 500,000 pounds of AR500 steel plate.
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Police Arrest Seven Using Netpresenter Digital Signage

The Dutch Regional Police Service Groningen has implemented a new system to broadcast all points bulletins (APBs) via digital signage screens and personal digital assistants (PDAs). The integrated system, provided by Netpresenter, has resulted in seven arrests.

The Netpresenter system shows pictures, APB information, and even video material of wanted and missing persons on large screens in secured areas in police stations and on the intranet. On officers’ PDAs, location-specific information is provided using the Global Positioning System (GPS). The system uses color codes so that officers can immediately determine the type and priority level of any message.

“The strength of the solution is recurrence of the message,” claims Roland Hiemstra, project leader of digital media at the Regional Police Service Groningen. “Faces and names of suspects are remembered better because the officers see the information multiple times. Officers often tell me they were able to make an arrest because they recognized a face or name from Netpresenter.”

In implementing the system, Regional Police Service Groningen follows in the footsteps of police services worldwide using Netpresenter for their internal communications, including the Merseyside Police of Liverpool, United Kingdom, and the Toronto, Canada, Police Service. The Regional Police Service Groningen, however, is one of the first police services worldwide optimizing the internal communication of APBs by using the right mix of push-and-pull technology—24 hours a day, seven days a week. And it does so successfully: research shows 85 percent of officers appreciate the system; 60 percent would feel less informed without it.

“With Netpresenter we can reuse the same information for different channels without adding to the work. The system leads to significant time and cost savings and can easily be linked to other systems. Another benefit: anyone that can use e-mail can work with this system; it is that easy,” concludes Hiemstra.
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Lion Apparel Delivers Safety to Florida Law Enforcement Agencies

Local Florida law enforcement agencies that make up the Regional Domestic Security Task Force special weapons and tactics (SWAT) teams received their 675 new Tactix MT94 protective ensembles, thanks to a grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Lion Apparel. A one-time windfall of residual DHS funds allowed for the massive statewide purchase that will replace existing SWAT tactical chemical/biological protective garments in the field. The state Division of Emergency Management selected Lion Apparel after a thorough consideration of competitive offerings. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement facilitated the distribution of ensembles for the regional teams composed of county sheriffs offices and police departments.

The MT94 ensemble guards against challenges identified in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards. This multiwear ensemble is designed to provide protection against a variety of threats, including chemical and biological terrorism agents. The MT94 employs Gore Chempak Ultra Barrier fabric, a thin, lightweight, and high-strength PTFE film with a tough Nomex outer shell. When combined with the streamlined and functional design of the MT94, it delivers outstanding protection and creates a significant reduction in weight and bulk. This provides a greater range of motion, increased mobility, and ease in putting it on and taking it off.

“What separates the MT94 from all other chemically protective ensembles is its combination of durability, mobility, safety, and comfort,” said Lieutenant Ed Allen, emergency management coordinator of the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office, another recipient agency. “The MT94 really showcases its tactical mobility. It is lightweight and easy to don and doff, so our officers can perform more efficiently and effectively. Plus, it’s reusable. We can wash and wear it multiple times as long as it hasn’t been exposed or contaminated.”■
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From The Police Chief, vol. 74, no. 9, September 2007. Copyright held by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 USA.








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