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Back to Archives | Back to January 2010 Contents 

2009 IACP Awards "Part 2"


The Michael Shanahan Award for Excellence in Public/Private Cooperation, sponsored by the Security Industry Association, honors Chief Michael Shanahan (Retired), who served the University of Washington Police Department for 24 years before retiring in 1995. The award recognizes outstanding achievement in the development and implementation of public/private cooperation for public safety. As a joint award it recognizes the efforts of law enforcement agencies and private sector organizations partnering to make a difference in communities.


Left to right: Dan Rosenblatt, IACP executive director;
Mark Marshall, IACP second vice president; Mark
Visbal, director of Research and Technology, Security
Industry Association; Commander Rick Weil, Deerfield,
Illinois, Police Department; Chief John Sliozis,
Deerfield, Illinois, Police Department; Chief Russell B.
Laine, IACP president; Stan Martin, executive director,
Security Industry Alarm Coalition; Rocco Diina,
co-chair, IACP Private Sector Liaison Committee;
and Rad Jones, co-chair, IACP Private Sector Liaison
Committee

The 2009 winner is the cooperative partnership between the Deerfield, Illinois, Police Department and the Lake Cook Regional Critical Incident Partnership (LCRCIP). LCRCIP is an organization comprising public agencies and community businesses in the southern Lake and northern Cook County region. The LCRCIP was developed and implemented to further public/private cooperation in public safety, focusing on emergency preparedness response to critical incidents using an all-hazards approach that includes resource development and mitigating the impact of critical incidents, especially for the private sector. After inception of this program, the Deerfield Police Department formed strong partnership ties with the entire LCRCIP and its local corporations: Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Baxter Healthcare, and Walgreens. Together, they developed mutual and respective goals and an understanding of how public and private resources exchange of information can complement and support each other’s missions. In addition, the partnership has led to greater overall efficiency and effectiveness and outstanding cooperation in public safety.

2010 application due date: April 30, 2010.

For more information about the Michael Shanahan Award for Excellence in Public/Private Cooperation, visit the awards section of the IACP Web site, www.theiacp.org, or contact Nancy Kolb at the IACP, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2357; by phone at 1-800-THE-IACP, extension 813, or via e-mail at kolbn@theiacp.org.


Outstanding Achievement in Law Enforcement Volunteer Programs Award

This award, sponsored by the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), recognizes volunteer programs that demonstrate innovative, effective practices for augmenting sworn or civilian staff and/or improving service delivery to their communities. Members of the IACP Police Administration Committee meet annually to judge the award applications and select up to three winning agencies. This year’s award recipients are Chesterfield, Virginia, County Police Department; Mesa, Arizona, Police Department; and San Antonio, Texas; Police Department.


Accepting the award on behalf of their winning
agencies were (left to right) Officer Juan Ayala, San
Antonio, Texas, Police Department; Officer Linda Bailey,
Mesa, Arizona, Police Department; and Colonel
Thierry Guy Dupuis, Chesterfield County, Virginia,
Police Department
Photo courtesy of Bill Cronin

Chesterfield County, Virginia, Police Department

The Chesterfield County Police Department has 407 sworn police officers and 104 civilian personnel serving a population of 314,000 residents in suburban Richmond, Virginia. The volunteer program began in 1967 as a special police program that evolved into an auxiliary program and then developed into the present-day multifaceted volunteer program. Volunteers provide services to the Auxiliary Police, the Crime Solvers Board, the Law Enforcement Explorer Post, the Police Chaplain Program, Animal Control Assistance, the Police Foundation, the Motorist Assistance Team, the Volunteer Mail Courier Program, the Special Events Team, the Training Academy Volunteer Actors, and the Neighborhood Watch Council. In addition, the volunteers assist the Forensic Unit, the Crime Prevention Unit, the Personnel Unit, the Property Unit, the Child Safety Office, and the Training Academy.

Since 2004, the program has increased from 120 to 216 volunteers. This past year, police volunteers contributed 36,274 hours of value-added services to the department and the community. Examples of tangible results include volunteers working with Crime Solvers, on 22,513 tips, leading to 5,725 crimes solved. In 2008, Animal Control took 10,150 calls for service resulting in 4,635 impounded animals. During 2008, the Motor Assistance Team assisted 603 disabled motorists, provided assistance at 328 crashes, attended 277 miscellaneous calls, and participated in 117 special events. The Spanish language volunteer provided instruction to more than 100 police recruits and 50 veteran officers.


Mesa, Arizona, Police Department

The Mesa Police Department has approximately 1,300 employees serving a growing city of almost half a million people. The volunteer program began in 1990 with five volunteers and has grown to 146. Approximately one-third of the volunteers have served more than five years, including 11 volunteers who have provided more than 15 years of service. Volunteers provide services in a wide range of assignments throughout the department, assisting with processing DUI suspects, monitoring vehicle speed, collecting information, and following up on current and older unsolved cases. In 2008, the Mesa Police Department was the first agency in Arizona to establish a crime scene technician volunteer position. After classroom and field training, volunteers who are assigned these duties work independently, processing crime scenes and increasing the department’s ability to offer additional support for ongoing investigations.

Volunteers provide support in Spanish translation services, assisting victims at the Center Against Family Violence, the training academy, technical support for the department’s computer center, operating stationary radar in support of traffic enforcement operations, assisting with logging and transporting evidence for the Forensic Services Section’s Biology Unit, and maintaining a media archive in the Media Relations Office among other areas. The Mesa Police Department was the first agency in Arizona to have volunteers use license plate reader equipment to locate stolen vehicles and conduct background interviews for volunteer applicants. In 2008, volunteers contributed 22,585 hours for an added value to the department and the community of $457,346.


San Antonio, Texas, Police Department

The San Antonio Police Department has approximately 600 volunteers, ranging in age from 18 to 90 years old, who assist a police department of 2,000 sworn officers and a city population of approximately 1.3 million people. The volunteer program began in 1997, and over the past 11 years, more than 2,000 San Antonio citizens have participated.

Volunteers provide assistance to many areas and units, including Homicide, Sex Crimes, Juvenile Records, Court Liaison, Vehicle and Property Crimes, Arson and Special Crimes, Internal Affairs, the Crime Stoppers Program, the Training Academy, the Canine Unit, the Public Information Office, the Photo Lab, and the Helicopter Unit. In addition, volunteers assist the department by participating in the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), the Warrant Drive Enforcers Program, and the Citizens Observers Auto Theft Surveillance Team. Volunteers also provide their help to the Family Assistance Crisis Team (FACT) for domestic violence victim assistance and the Blue Santa Program, which organizes food transports and toy donations and distribution. In addition, six retired and experienced police detectives have volunteered as open-unsolved case homicide reviewers since 2007.

The Public Safety Team issues handicap parking tickets and educates the public regarding handicap parking laws. The Citizen Police Academy Alumni Association provides support to the Training Academy, and the Graffiti Enforcement Unit utilizes 50 volunteers to staff a new closed-circuit TV monitoring station.

In 2008, the CERT provided 3,500 hours of service during hurricanes Dolly, Gustav, and Ike, as well as Tropical Storm Eduard. In early 2009, the department participated in the Texas Warrant Round-up. The efforts of 15 volunteers helped officers clear 19,255 warrants. FACT volunteers provided 10,110 hours of services to victims of domestic violence in one year.

2010 applications due: May 17, 2010

For more information about the Outstanding Achievement in Law Enforcement Volunteer Programs Award, visit the awards section of the IACP Web site, www.theiacp.org, or contact Carolyn Cockroft at the IACP, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2357; by phone at 1-800-THE-IACP, extension 206; or via e-mail at cockroftc@theiacp.org.


IACP August Vollmer Excellence in Forensic Science Award

The August Vollmer Excellence in Forensic Science Award honors the proactive, innovative use of forensic technologies by law enforcement and recognizes the significant impact forensic science has on the criminal justice system.

Nominations are accepted in the following categories:

  • Innovation in Forensic Technology

  • Significant Investigative Value in a Major Crime

  • Current or Past Contribution to Forensic Science by Police Agency

  • Enhancement of Forensic Capability by a Forensic Science Provider

  • Current or Past Contribution to Forensic Science by an Individual

  • Current or Past Collaboration in Forensic Science


Left to right: Dr. Ray Prime, IACP Forensic Committee
co-chair, director, Centre of Forensic Sciences;
Mr. Rocky Edwards, Santa Ana, California, Police
Department; Walter A. McNeil, secretary, Florida
Department of Corrections, IACP third vice president;
and Detective Louie Martinez, Santa Ana, California,
Police Department

Innovation in Forensic Technology: Detective Louie Martinez, Detective Ferrell Buckels, and Mr. Rocky Edwards, Santa Ana Police Department

Detective Martinez, Detective Buckels, and Mr. Edwards of the Santa Ana Police Department (SAPD) were able to solve a cold homicide case and obtain a conviction by calling upon experience and utilizing cutting-edge 3D imaging not available a few years ago.

From the beginning, police in Orange County, California, had a prime suspect in the March 1994 homicide of Philip Cousins. Cousins had argued shortly before his death with an employee named Doug Mireles, but police were never able to match the bullets taken from Cousins’ body with the gun seized from Mireles’ home.

At that time the barrel of the gun had been tampered with and damaged so badly that the 1990s examination techniques made it impossible for ballistics experts to connect the fatal bullets to the suspected killer. The case remained unsolved. In 2006, Detective Martinez and his partner, retired Detective Buckels, began looking at dozens of unsolved homicides, including the Cousins murder. The detectives retrieved Mireles’s chopped-up gun out of the evidence locker and determined that a top quarter inch of the part of the barrel nearest to the muzzle may provide evidence. By using the Integrated Ballistic Identification System Bullettrax-3D system, highly detailed pictures of a bullet’s surface was obtained. Re-testing the bullet that killed Cousins, comparing it with other bullets fired from Mireles’s gun, revealed clear correlation between the scratches on the autopsy bullet and the test bullets where they had passed through a tiny part of the gun barrel in 1994. Armed with the 3D images, Edwards knew which area of the bullet to concentrate on when confirming his findings on the comparison microscope. The striations on the bullets and the marks inside the gun barrel showed that Mireles’ gun had fired the bullets in Cousins’s murder, including the one the coroner had recovered during Cousins’s autopsy.

Mireles was arrested in 2007; indicted by a grand jury; and, in 2009, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 28 years in prison for first-degree murder.


Left to right: Dr. Ray Prime, IACP Forensic Committee
co-chair, director, Centre of Forensic Sciences;
Ms. Irma Rios, assistant director, Houston, Texas,
Police Department, Crime Laboratory; and Walter A.
McNeil, IACP third vice president, secretary, Florida
Department of Corrections

Significant Investigative Value in a Major Crime: Houston, Texas, Police Department, Crime Laboratory Division, Firearms Section

The Firearms Section of the Houston Police Department (HPD) Crime Laboratory Division utilized the Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS) to link firearms evidence in 12 different investigations involving members of the La Tercera Crips (LTC) gang over a 10-month period. These diligent efforts resulted in the arrest of eight gang members and the recovery of some of the murder weapons.

Because of the innovative, aggressive approach to ballistic imaging, firearms section personnel were able to image firearms and fired evidence recovered in an investigation and determine if the same firearm was used in the commission of more than one crime all within a 24-hour window. It is extremely rare to find an IBIS site around the country that has implemented this structure. With many of the LTC incidents occurring within weeks of each other, firearms section personnel were able to relay the hit information quickly to detectives, allowing them to move rapidly in associating suspects to crimes.

The notification procedure and diagram utilized to inform detectives of the hits were also innovative. Firearms section personnel have established points of contact in the investigative divisions of HPD to disseminate quickly the hit information resulting from IBIS entries. Using the diagram gave detectives a better understanding of how the different crimes were related.


Left to right: Walter A. McNeil, IACP third vice
president, secretary, Florida Department of Corrections;
Mr. David Epstein, chief operating officer,
National Forensic Science Technology Center; Mr.
Kevin Lothridge, CEO, National Forensic Science
Technology Center; and Dr. Ray Prime, IACP
Forensic Committee co-chair, director, Centre of
Forensic Sciences

Contribution to Forensic Science by a Police Agency: Mr. Kevin Lothridge, National Forensic Science Technology Center

The National Forensic Science Technology Center (NFSTC) developed the Deployable Forensic Laboratory as an enhancement to forensic capabilities used to address backlogs or interruptions of service due to disaster or construction. This technical assistance tool provides moveable, flexible laboratory space that can supplement existing crime analysis capabilities, or replace them, when necessary, in an innovative and efficient way. Developed in partnership with the Department of Defense and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the NFSTC deployable laboratories make a critical difference to local or national forces when needed.

In 2008, the NFSTC deployable forensic laboratories supported the public crime laboratory run by the Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Police Department. The worst flooding in the city’s history submerged 1,300 city blocks, required the evacuation of 24,000 people, and put the city’s crime laboratory under eight feet of water. Much of the forensic equipment was destroyed and the buildings were immediately unavailable and remained so during the major renovations that followed.

After the flood, the Cedar Rapids Police Department moved its forensic operations to an unventilated garage for a few months, but difficulties with cross-contamination, security, and record cold temperatures created an untenable situation. With funding from the National Institute of Justice, a deployable forensic laboratory was made available to the department. Once the laboratory and equipment arrived, it was set up in the police department parking lot, and, in just a few hours, the laboratory was fully operational and the forensics team could return to processing evidence at a normal rate. The police department’s crime scene investigation unit is fully operational thanks to the help of NFSTC’s deployable forensic laboratory.


Left to right: Dr. Ray Prime, IACP Forensic Committee
co-chair, director, Centre of Forensic Sciences;
Ms. Nelly Miles, Chemistry Section manager, Georgia
Bureau of Investigation; Mr. Vernon Keenan, director,
Georgia Bureau of Investigation; and Walter A.
McNeil, IACP third vice president, secretary, Florida
Department of Corrections

Enhancement of Forensic Capability by a Forensic Science Provider: Georgia Bureau of Investigation’s Division of Forensic Sciences

To address the challenges of increased evidence submissions and the resulting backlogs, scientist retention issues and the resulting training issues for new scientists, and funding challenges that result in ongoing vacant positions, the crime laboratory’s management decided to impact operations in the Drug Chemistry section by shifting the identification of marijuana from the state crime laboratory to local law enforcement agencies.

The crime laboratory strengthened its Marijuana-Certified Examiner course, designed to train officers to test and identify marijuana, by extending the course from one to two days, adding instruction in the areas of sampling and legal matters, and providing courtroom training. The course requires successful completion of a proficiency test as well as a written examination. Upon completion of the course, the officers are authorized by the laboratory to perform analysis on suspected marijuana samples.

In January 2007, laboratory staff began conducting assistance visits for each agency that employs certified marijuana examiners and is performing marijuana testing. These assistance visits, which occur every three years per agency, help ensure the quality of the testing that is occurring and make the program more defensible in court, while also providing an opportunity for the Division of Forensic Sciences staff to respond to questions regarding forensic analysis and crime laboratory–related concerns.

In May 2006, a certified officer’s testimony was challenged in court. The trial court issued a favorable ruling, which was affirmed by the Georgia Court of Appeals. On June 12, 2006, in the case of Carson v. Georgia, 280 Ga. App. 595, the Court of Appeals declared that officers trained and certified through the Marijuana-Certified Examiner’s course are able to testify in court regarding their conclusions.


Left to right: Walter A. McNeil, IACP third vice president,
secretary, Florida Department of Corrections;
Mr. David S. Shaver, supervisory special agent/forensic
examiner, Computer Crime Investigative Unit,
U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command; and
Dr. Ray Prime, IACP Forensic Committee co-chair,
director, Centre of Forensic Sciences

Contribution to Forensic Science by an Individual: Special Agent David S. Shaver, Computer Crime Investigative Unit, U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command

Over the past 10 years, Supervisory Special Agent (SSA) David Shaver has distinguished himself in the field of computer forensic science as a leader and technical visionary developing innovative forensic utilities and methodologies that have greatly benefited the forensic and law enforcement communities. As the Forensic Team Chief for the United States Army Criminal Investigation Command’s Computer Crime Investigative Unit (CCIU), SSA Shaver led by example and personally conducted and/or supervised over 200 examinations; these forensic examinations contributed to investigative successes throughout CCIU and the Army.

SSA Shaver developed the Rapid Extraction and Analysis Program (REAP) that allows non-CCIU personnel to preserve and collect digital evidence in an automated manner during computer intrusion response activities, expedites dissemination of critical threat information to network defenders, and facilitates the analysis of malicious software. SSA Shaver’s computer forensics expertise also resulted in requests from the Department of Defense Criminal Investigation Task Force to support extremely sensitive criminal investigations involving the Global War on Terror. In response to these unique investigative requirements, SSA Shaver developed an innovative methodology for using the Virtual Machine utility that has revolutionized interrogation techniques. Virtual Machine allows field agents to examine a forensic copy of the suspect’s computer in a virtual manner that replicates all aspects of the computer, including the screensaver, desktop wallpaper, files, and installed programs; this approach represents a quantum leap beyond previous examination methodologies that frequently proved difficult and cumbersome for field agents and prosecutors.

2010 applications are due no later than April 16, 2010.

For more information about the August Vollmer Excellence in Forensic Science Award, visit the awards section of the IACP Web site, www.theiacp.org, or contact Aviva Kurash at the IACP, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2357; by phone at 1-800-THE-IACP, extension 809; or via e-mail at kurasha@theiacp.org.


Excellence in Law Enforcement Research Award

The IACP Research Advisory Committee (RAC) has established a yearly research award to be given to a law enforcement agency for research performed either with a research partner or exclusively by the agency. The purpose of the award is to promote innovative research in policing that ultimately enhances police performance and public safety.


Left to right: Dr. Charles F. Wellford, University of
Maryland; Chief Susan Riseling, University of Wisconsin–
Madison Police Department, IACP vice president
at large; Chief Ronal W. Serpas, Metropolitan
Nashville Police Department; Chief Superintendent
Nora Skelding, Ontario Provincial Police; Inspector
Craig Duffin, Royal Canadian Mounted Police;
Daniel Gillison, national director, Sprint Nextel; and
John Firman, director, IACP Research Center

In 1999, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Ontario Provincial Police began collaborating on an initiative to replace outdated resourcing and deployment tools. A National Resourcing Task Force was established and included subject matter experts in the field of mathematics and operational research, as well as police personnel experienced in police resourcing and deployment. The result of this initiative is the creation of a new resourcing tool that meets the needs of two large, diverse, and geographically dispersed police agencies. This included the development of a prototype in 2003, evolving to a refined working model in 2007, with training and implementation in 2008 and 2009.

2010 applications due: June 30, 2010

For more information about the Excellence in Law Enforcement Research Award, visit the awards section of the IACP Web site, www.theiacp.org, or contact Carrie Corsoro at the IACP, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2357; by phone at 1-800-THE-IACP, extension 392; or via e-mail at corsoro@theiacp.org.

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From The Police Chief, vol. LXXVII, no. 1, January 2010. Copyright held by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 USA.








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