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Back to Archives | Back to January 2010 Contents 

2009 IACP Awards "Part 3"


IACP/LogIn Excellence in Victim Services Award

This award recognizes law enforcement agencies that have developed and implemented innovative strategies for providing comprehensive services to victims of crime. The 2009 Excellence in Victim Services Award recipients are the State College, Pennsylvania, Police Department; the Irvine, California, Police Department; the Arlington, Texas, Police Department; and the Metropolitan Police Department of Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee.


Left to right: Carroll Ann Ellis, director, Victim
Services Division, Fairfax County, Virginia, Police
Department; Chief Thomas King, State College,
Pennsylvania, Police Department; Chief Carl Wolf,
vice president/treasurer, IACP; and Joye Frost, acting
director, Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice
Programs, U.S. Department of Justice

Smaller Agency Award: State College, Pennsylvania, Police Department, Victim Centered Intensive Case Management Unit (VCICM), State College, Pennsylvania

The State College, Pennsylvania, Police Department created the Victim Centered Intensive Case Management (VCICM) Unit in 2006 to centralize and coordinate the response to domestic violence and stalking cases, to improve the criminal justice response to victims, and to increase victim safety by improving the accountability of offenders. The unit works diligently to oversee the county’s response to victims and strives to ensure victims are treated with empathy and respect throughout the investigative and judicial processes.


Left to right: Carroll Ann Ellis, director, Victim
Services Division, Fairfax County, Virginia,
Police Department; Commander Mike Hamel,
Irvine, California, Police Department; Detective
Sergeant John Condon, Irvine, California, Police
Department; Chief Carl Wolf, vice president/treasurer,
IACP; Chief David L. Maggard Jr. Irvine,
California, Police Department; and Joye Frost,
acting director, Office for Victims of Crime, Office
of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice

Medium Agency Category: Irvine Police Department, Family Violence Prevention Project, Irvine, California

The Irvine, California, Police Department’s (IPD) victim response philosophy is that any comprehensive victim response initiative must also consider prevention, and that the term “victim” should include family members, neighbors, or friends who are emotionally or financially impacted by a criminal act. Leadership within IPD has created a Family Violence Prevention Focus Group wherein partners, including sworn and civilian members, currently participate with the mission of the Family Violence Prevention Project to implement sustainable and proactive strategies to reduce the occurrence of family violence while increasing the rate of victim reporting.


Left to right: Carroll Ann Ellis, director, Victim
Services Division, Fairfax County, Virginia, Police
Department; Derrelynn Perryman, LCSW, victim
services coordinator, Arlington, Texas, Police Department;
Chief Carl Wolf, vice president/treasurer, IACP;
Chief Theron L. Bowman, Ph.D., Arlington, Texas,
Police Department; and Joye Frost, acting director,
Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs,
U.S. Department of Justice

Large Agency Category: Arlington Police Department, Victim Assistance Program, Arlington, Texas

The Arlington, Texas, Police Department created its Victim Assistance Program to provide services to victims and family members with the goal of lessening the short- and long-term trauma experienced as a direct result of victimization. Services to victims provided through the program include crisis intervention and follow-up assistance, facilitating utilization of available resources, safety planning, guiding victims through the criminal justice system process, and assisting victims with identified short- and long-term needs.


Left to right: Carroll Ann Ellis, director, Victim
Services Division, Fairfax County, Virginia, Police
Department; Carol Gipson, Ph.D., Domestic Violence
Crisis Counseling supervisor, Metropolitan Police
Department; Lorraine W. Greene, Ph.D., executive
staff and manager, Behavioral Health Services
Division, Metropolitan Police Department; Chief
Carl Wolf, vice president/treasurer, IACP; Amy
Griffith Taylor, MSSW, Victim Intervention Program
Crisis Counseling supervisor, Metropolitan Police
Department; and Joye Frost, acting director, Office
for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S.
Department of Justice

Extra Large Agency Category: Metropolitan Police Department of Nashville and Davidson County, Integrated Victim Services, Nashville, Tennessee

The Metropolitan Police Department of Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee, has instituted, supported, and continuously expanded programs to respond to the needs of crime victims, their family members, and others affected by the crime within the community for over 35 years. Although the components of the services have evolved throughout their history as needs of the community have changed, the department has always held to the premise that anyone affected by violent crime should be offered free and immediate crisis intervention and follow-up counseling.

Agencies selected as honorable mentions were the University of New Hampshire Police Department; the Abington, Pennsylvania, Township Police Department; the Mesa, Arizona, Police Department; and the Albuquerque, New Mexico, Police Department.

2010 applications due: May 1, 2010

For more information about the IACP/LogIn Excellence in Victim Services Award, visit the awards section of the IACP Web site, www.theiacp.org, or contact Keely McCarthy at the IACP, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2357; by phone at 1-800-THE-IACP, extension 810: or via e-mail at mccarthy@theiacp.org.


2009 Looking Beyond the License Plate Program

This annual award recognizes the vital role that license plates play in solving serious, non-traffic crimes. The Highway Safety Committee, in partnership with 3M’s Traffic Safety Systems Division, selects the law enforcement officer who demonstrates the most initiative in solving a serious crime via this vital, cost-effective, and readily identifiable tool, the display of which is mandated in every state/province and the information concerning which is virtually instantly accessible to police officers employing current technologies.


Left to right: J.D. Sobol, 3M professional services
manager; Sergeant Darron D. Conrad and Sheriff E. S.
Gentry, Gloucester County, Virginia, Sheriff’s Office;
and Anoop K. Gupta, 3M marketing manager

Sergeant Darron D. Conrad, Gloucester County, Virginia, Sheriff’s Office

On October 22, 2008, Sergeant Conrad observed a vehicle, the rear registration plate of which was bug-splattered. He surmised that such a plate was consistent with one typically appearing on the front of a vehicle, queried the registration number via the Virginia Crime Information Network, and found that the plate in question was registered to another vehicle. Upon initiating a traffic stop on the vehicle, Sergeant Conrad learned that its operator, who admitted that the bug-splattered plate belonged on a different vehicle, was driving on a suspended driver’s license. During the course of the stop, Sergeant Conrad detected the odor of marijuana in the vehicle; a subsequent search of both the driver and the vehicle revealed two morphine pills in one of the driver’s pockets, a fully loaded handgun with its serial number obliterated in the driver’s door compartment, four baggies of marijuana, and a digital scale. The driver was charged with felony possession of a controlled substance, felony possession of a controlled substance without a valid prescription, possession with intent to sell marijuana, concealed weapon, and altering/defacing/destroying the serial number on a firearm.

Sergeant Conrad was selected as the 2007 grand prize winner for apprehending two suspects involved in the armed robbery and attempted first-degree murder of a Maryland restaurant manager. He is the only officer to have twice received this award.

2010 applications due: May 31, 2010

For more information about the 2010 Looking Beyond the License Plate Program, visit the awards section of the IACP Web site www.theiacp.org or contact Dick Ashton at the IACP, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2357; by phone at 1-800-THE-IACP, extension 276; or via e-mail at ashtonr@theiacp.org.


J. Stannard Baker Award for Highway Safety

The prestigious J. Stannard Baker Award annually recognizes individual lifetime contributions to highway safety. Law enforcement officers of state, county, metropolitan, or municipal agencies, as well as other private or public sector representatives, are selected by the IACP Highway Safety Committee for their sustained, continuous, career-spanning, and unusual initiative and creativity in developing and implementing highway safety programs within their agencies or within the communities they serve. The award is presented by the IACP, in collaboration with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Northwestern University’s Center for Public Safety.


Left to right: Lieutenant Colonel Silvester Dawson,
Lieutenant William H. Leeper, and Colonel John T.
Czernis, all of the Florida Highway Patrol

Lieutenant William H. Leeper, Florida Highway Patrol, Jacksonville, Florida

Lieutenant Leeper is recognized for developing, implementing, and promoting numerous traffic safety programs within the state of Florida during his more than 32 years’ service with the Florida Highway Patrol. In his current position as a public affairs officer, he has passionately supported myriad traffic safety programs and has championed virtually every aspect of safe vehicle operation.


Left to right: Chief Michael J. Capriglione, Newport,
Delaware, Police Department, and his fiancée Heather
A. Argue

Chief Michael J. Capriglione, Newport, Delaware, Police Department

Chief Capriglione is recognized for developing, implementing, and promoting traffic safety programs within the state of Delaware during his 28 years as Chief of Police of Newport. He not only has worked conscientiously to ensure that effective and safe strategies are devised, but he always has chosen to be “where the rubber meets the road.” New Castle County’s “Checkpoint Strikeforce,” for example, has accounted for 71 percent of the entire state’s enforcement activities in this campaign while making only 4 percent of the total vehicle contacts.


Left to right: Illinois Senator John J. Cullerton and
Highway Safety Committee member and Assistant
Chief Steven R. Casstevens, Hoffman Estates, Illinois,
Police Department
Photo courtesy of Chief Casstevens

The Honorable John J. Cullerton, President of the Illinois Senate, Chicago, Illinois

Senator Cullerton is recognized for drafting and promoting traffic safety legislation within the state of Illinois during his 30-year tenure in its legislature. He has consistently supported bills to make the roadways safer for drivers and passengers, among which are those mandating more effective occupant protection, DUI, and graduated driver’s licensing measures.

Complete descriptions of these individuals’ achievements can be found at the highway safety awards section of the IACP Web site www.theiacp.org.

2010 applications due: May 14, 2010

For more information about the 2010 J. Stannard Baker Award for Highway Safety, visit the awards section of the IACP Web site, www.theiacp.org, or contact Dick Ashton at the IACP, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2357; by phone at 1-800-THE-IACP, extension 276; or via e-mail at ashtonr@theiacp.org.


Vehicle Theft Award of Merit

This award recognizes annually up to five categories of law enforcement agencies, task forces, councils, community partnerships, and other theft prevention alliances for their outstanding contributions to vehicle theft prevention and/or enforcement. A new award was launched in 2008 to recognize an individual law enforcement officer’s outstanding efforts in this realm. Entries are judged by the Vehicle Theft Committee on initiative, use of available resources, and overall results. This program is supported by the ATX Group, LoJack Corporation, OnStar by GM, and Remington ELSAG Law Enforcement Systems, LLC.


Left to right: Mr. Patrick Gendreau and Chief Pierre
Goupil, of the Aéroports de Montréal’s Airport Patrol

Agency (251-1,000 Officers) Recognition: The Aéroports de Montréal’s Airport Patrol

The Aéroports de Montréal’s Airport Patrol is responsible for the operation of the Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport, as well as the Montréal–Mirabel International Airport. Approximately 1.7 million vehicles each year park in the 12,395 available spaces at the Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport. In 2005, 224 vehicle thefts occurred, but only 36 were recorded in 2008, an 84 percent decrease. Moreover, only five vehicles were reported stolen between January 1 and May 11, 2009. The dramatic decline resulted from the Airport Patrol’s ambitious and successful program.

Agency Recognition (1,001 + Officers): The Chungbuk Provincial Police Agency, South Korea

Through the use of high-tech scientific policing devices, the Chungbuk Provincial Police Agency was able to clear by arrest 39 vehicle thefts in 2008, compared to 32 in 2007, an increase of 20 percent; and anticipated many more clearances once all of its technology is in place.

Multi-Agency Task Force Recognition: The San Diego, California, Regional Auto Theft Task Force (RATT), represented by Commissioner Joseph A. Farrow, California Highway Patrol

This is a multi-agency task force comprised of 13 local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies that undertook two major efforts: First, Operation Knee Drag targeted the theft of “sport type” motorcycles in southern San Diego County, many of which occurred on military bases and/or affected military personnel. These thefts were undertaken by small, independent cells who communicated to various degrees with one another, who were involved with Mexican drug cartels, and who rode the stolen motorcycles directly to Mexican chop shops. One of these cells was infiltrated and dismantled after 12 months, with 74 arrests and 60 stolen motorcycle recoveries.

The second effort, involved the arrest of 75 persons in Operation Northern Alliance where five detectives recovered 175 vehicles with an estimated value of more than $1.2 million. Thefts in each of the five North County regions declined by at least 15 percent and by as much as 24 percent in 2008 compared to 2007.


Left to right: Patrick Clancy, vice president of law
enforcement, LoJack Corporation; Mrs. Sally Terp;
Major Greg Terp, Miami-Dade, Florida, Police
Department; Jerry Cole, West Coast director,
LoJack Corporation
Photo courtesy of Erin Schrad

Individual Recognition: Major Greg Terp, of the Miami-Dade, Florida, Police Department

Major Greg Terp has devoted himself to deterring, investigating, and prosecuting vehicle theft. Between 1996 and 2007, he commanded the Miami-Dade Multi-Agency Auto Theft Task Force and served during that assignment as the chair—and now as a board member—of the North American Export Committee. He has actively supported the full implementation and funding of the Anti-Car Theft Act of 1992, including the complete development of the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) with access available to law enforcement.

He researched means by which to scan cargo containers and settled on radiation portal monitors that did not impede commerce or generate unreasonable costs, had a prototype developed, and tested it at the Port of Miami. The test was so successful that these monitors are now being utilized at the top 80 ports in the United States and has resulted in all containers arriving at the Port of Miami being scanned for stolen vehicles.

The Miami-Dade Multi-Agency Auto Theft Task Force successfully piloted in 2006 and 2007, automated license plate recognition (ALPR) units, the use of which eventually spread to robbery and gang investigations, as well as to intelligence gathering in homeland security matters.

Major Terp has assisted U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in developing the Auto Theft Interdiction Program, the purpose of which will be to provide members of state and local law enforcement with CBP authority to assist in inspecting cargo containers and in seizing stolen vehicles and other items. This program is expected to be implemented in the near future.

2010 applications due: May 10, 2010

For more information about the 2010 Vehicle Theft Award of Merit, visit the awards section of the IACP Web site, www.theiacp.org, or contact Dick Ashton at the IACP, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2357; by phone at 1-800-THE-IACP, extension 276; or via e-mail at ashtonr@theiacp.org.

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From The Police Chief, vol. LXXVII, no. 1, January 2010. Copyright held by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 USA.








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